Constructing an S&C Needs Analysis - A Sample Model for Kiteboard Racing

Constructing an S&C Needs Analysis - A Sample Model for Kiteboard Racing

The vast majority of sports in the modern era demand the training and targeting of a variety of specific qualities, as well as individual needs. This is dictated by the realities of key factors that any coach and athlete face including competition calendars, training/travel schedules, physical training compatibility, de-training timelines of physical qualities, and an athlete’s life outside of training amongst a host of other considerations. Many of these would be straightforward to address in isolation, however this is rarely (if ever) an option when striving for the comprehensive physical preparation of athletes competing in sports with concurrent and oftentimes conflicting training requirements (Issurin).
 

Performance Cueing: Implications in Velocity Performance?

Performance Cueing: Implications in Velocity Performance?

Sound coaching requires sound communication. The intricacies into how we cue, instruct, and coach our athletes can certainly aid in fostering a better relationship, buy-in, trust and performance outcomes to those whom we serve. On the other side of the coin, poor communication with over-coaching and -cueing and using scientific jargon to get your message across can take you down a path of misunderstanding, lack of adherence, and disrupted focus. As coaches, we need to discover how to effectively manage the way in which we communicate on more of a spectrum, finely tuning and balancing to individualize our message to cater to better outcomes in our athletes!

Tales From The Trenches: Directional Bias Programming with Sam Leslie

Tales From The Trenches: Directional Bias Programming with Sam Leslie

I’m an unashamed fan of technology for measuring performance, so PUSH bands have become a big part of my work with athletes at MyPhysio Evolution clinic. The instantaneous verification of what you see and the assistance it gives to an athlete’s motivation when used repeatedly for testing progress make it a great little tool. My particular area of research is a concept called Direction Bias. In a nutshell it boils down to a few key concepts:

A New State of the Art in Human Movement Recognition

A New State of the Art in Human Movement Recognition

With the mainstream arrival of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), numerous algorithms have been developed in an attempt to tackle various challenges. However, the applied aspects of AI lag far behind its theoretical potential. In part, this is due to the lack of information and data resources which are the main inputs for training the algorithms, as well as the limitations of computational processing power. Data and processing limitations aside, the theoretical accuracy of many of these algorithms often fall short of what is required for performance in a real-world scenario.

In an attempt to break new ground in this field, PUSH recently collaborated with scientists in the Adaptive Research Laboratory at the University of Waterloo (UW). The team, led by professor Dana Kulic, used PUSH’s dataset to “push” the envelope in HAR. PUSH defined two different problem scenarios, one tackled by the algorithms scientists at PUSH and the other assigned to the research group at UW.

Velocity Loss Cutoff - The Most Actionable VBT Metric For Coaches and Athletes

Velocity Loss Cutoff - The Most Actionable VBT Metric For Coaches and Athletes

With a growing amount of gym tech available, combined with the widespread adoption of velocity-based training (VBT), it’s easy to get lost in the chaos of information available ‘on-the-line’. However, when it comes to the daily practical application of objective measurement, simple and actionable reign supreme. We want to bring back the simplicity of VBT, which is why we are introducing the ‘Velocity Loss Cutoff’ feature: to help drive the implementation of autoregulation.

Tales From The Trenches: Josh Perry, BMX Pro

Tales From The Trenches: Josh Perry, BMX Pro

Josh Perry’s BMX career started the same as many other’s: a young kid in the skate park looking to jump higher and go faster than his skateboard allowed. It was shortly after Josh went pro that his journey, and life, turned upside down.

Multiple brain tumors, a severe ACL tear, and a long road to recovery; nothing has come easy for Josh. 

We sat down and spoke with the Cape Cod, Massachusetts native to discuss his incredible journey, the role strength and conditioning has played in getting him back on the bike, and how his training at the Athletic Lab with a PUSH Band is taking his on-bike performance to the next level.