A New State of the Art in Human Movement Recognition

A New State of the Art in Human Movement Recognition

With the mainstream arrival of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), numerous algorithms have been developed in an attempt to tackle various challenges. However, the applied aspects of AI lag far behind its theoretical potential. In part, this is due to the lack of information and data resources which are the main inputs for training the algorithms, as well as the limitations of computational processing power. Data and processing limitations aside, the theoretical accuracy of many of these algorithms often fall short of what is required for performance in a real-world scenario.

In an attempt to break new ground in this field, PUSH recently collaborated with scientists in the Adaptive Research Laboratory at the University of Waterloo (UW). The team, led by professor Dana Kulic, used PUSH’s dataset to “push” the envelope in HAR. PUSH defined two different problem scenarios, one tackled by the algorithms scientists at PUSH and the other assigned to the research group at UW.

Velocity Loss Cutoff - The Most Actionable VBT Metric For Coaches and Athletes

Velocity Loss Cutoff - The Most Actionable VBT Metric For Coaches and Athletes

With a growing amount of gym tech available, combined with the widespread adoption of velocity-based training (VBT), it’s easy to get lost in the chaos of information available ‘on-the-line’. However, when it comes to the daily practical application of objective measurement, simple and actionable reign supreme. We want to bring back the simplicity of VBT, which is why we are introducing the ‘Velocity Loss Cutoff’ feature: to help drive the implementation of autoregulation.

Tales From The Trenches: Josh Perry, BMX Pro

Tales From The Trenches: Josh Perry, BMX Pro

Josh Perry’s BMX career started the same as many other’s: a young kid in the skate park looking to jump higher and go faster than his skateboard allowed. It was shortly after Josh went pro that his journey, and life, turned upside down.

Multiple brain tumors, a severe ACL tear, and a long road to recovery; nothing has come easy for Josh. 

We sat down and spoke with the Cape Cod, Massachusetts native to discuss his incredible journey, the role strength and conditioning has played in getting him back on the bike, and how his training at the Athletic Lab with a PUSH Band is taking his on-bike performance to the next level.

VBT for the Youth Athlete: Too Soon?

VBT for the Youth Athlete: Too Soon?

The goal of this blog is for you, as a coach, to understand how VBT may be a valuable asset to you in the realm of youth athlete development. VBT is yet another tool in your toolbox to reinforce growth and development with the youth athlete in mind.

I have had the opportunity this summer to incorporate the PUSH Band into my strength and conditioning programming for a group of elite youth hockey athletes between 15-18 years old. Using the PUSH Band, I have come across valuable data that has not only reinforced the most successful (as defined by our own terms) offseason that I have had to date, but provided insight into the value that such a device can bring to athletes in the Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) Model.

Velocity Based Training & Non-Athlete Populations

An important aspect of VBT is to perform the concentric phase of each resistance exercise as fast as possible. This helps to maximise concentric power production (calculated as the product of velocity and force), which is a crucial metric for successful performance in contact sports. For example, in rugby league, more successful players are able to generate greater levels of muscle power than less successful players. While using VBT to enhance power production has clear benefits for competitive athletes, it may also be beneficial for non-athlete or clinical populations.