sport science

Improve Like a Pro, Choose a Training Focus

Improve Like a Pro, Choose a Training Focus

Why does Lebron James have a 40" vertical? How come goalies in the NHL can do the splits like world-class gymnasts? Yes there may be some genetic factors at play here but ask any athlete and they'll tell you that it's taken years of focused training to get to their level. Do you have a clear focus for your training? If not, it may be a good idea to take a page out of their book and start. And guess what, PUSH is here to help.

This week, we’re going to show you how easy it is to use the PUSH app to switch your training focus and we’ll briefly outline why specific exercises are associated with a specific training type.

PUSH Podcast - Dr. Mike T Nelson

PUSH Podcast - Dr. Mike T Nelson

Our first podcast and we're lucky to have an expert in the field of sport science, Dr. Mike T Nelson - one of our early beta testers. Listen to Dr. Mike T Nelson, PhD in Exercise Physiology, talk about how he designs programs for the average Joe, how athletes should incorporate variety into their workouts, his take on the role of technology in the world of strength & conditioning and why Lebron's low carb diet might impair the King's on-court performance.

You Can’t Measure What You Can’t See: The Efficacy of Visual Feedback by Glen Owen

You Can’t Measure What You Can’t See: The Efficacy of Visual Feedback by Glen Owen

It isn’t always a question of “what’s next?” but often a question of “what is happening right now?” Strength and conditioning coaches and athletes monitor training loads and intensity to show what training has been completed, and how subsequent training can be changed to affect performance. Similarly, some coaches use products like Heart Rate Variability to measure training ‘readiness’ and fatigue. Although these methods provide information an athlete can use between sessions, they do nothing in terms of providing feedback during training.

Neuromuscular Fatigue and Movement Velocity - by Cory Kennedy

Neuromuscular Fatigue and Movement Velocity - by Cory Kennedy

For athletes to perform at their very best, they need to feel 'fresh'. Meaning, they need to manage their recovery in order to free themselves of any acute or chronic exercise-induced fatigue. This can be a difficult task considering fatigue manifests itself in the body in different ways and can vary from one individual to the next. This week, Cory Kennedy, Athletic Development Specialist at FITS Toronto, will dissect fatigue and provide solutions on how it can be controlled and monitored. Cory works with a number of athletes, ranging from Olympians to aspiring youngsters and knows when it's time to push an athlete, and when it's time to pull back.